May 2007

Tuesday, May 1st, 2007

Over 90 percent of the Chiefs of Police and Sheriffs in the United States believe that any law-abiding citizen should be able to purchase a firearm for sport or self-defense, according to a recently-completed postal survey of professional American law enforcement command officers conducted by the National Association of Chiefs of Police (NACOP). NACOP reported the results of its 19th annual survey in the January/February issue of its official publication, The Chief of Police.
Police in suburban Cincinnati said that a man who was involved in a deadly shooting was attempting to stop an intruder from robbing him. Hamilton Police Detective Commander Lt. Scott Scrimizzi said that Jamie Buck in his home was defending himself from 31-year-old Millard Brandenburg of Hamilton who police said was attacking Buck with a sledgehammer. Buck suffered head injuries in the attack and was taken to Fort Hamilton Hospital where he was treated and released. Police got a call of a shooting about 1:30 one morning in late March, when Buck called 911 and told them that he had shot a guy and the guy was lying in Buck’s kitchen. “This guy just tried to break into my house,” said Buck. “I just shot him in my kitchen.” According to Fox 19 Cincinnati, no charges had been filed against Buck.
In Washington, D.C., Rep. Phil Gingrey of Georgia introduced the proposed Fairness in Firearms Testing Act, H.R. 1791, to improve consistency and accountability by giving U.S. gun manufacturers access to video documents of their products’ testing at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE). Congressman Gingrey says video documentation will give firearm manufacturers the right to contest and review BATFE testing decisions, “which are highly inconsistent.” He says also that, “currently, BATFE lacks written procedures and clear guidelines for firearm testing. How can we expect firearm manufacturers – or any industry, for that matter – to comply with moving target regulations? The Bureau’s rulings are so inconsistent that BATFE threatened to prosecute one gun manufacturer in Heard County, Georgia not even a year after sending written approval for that company’s product. This runaround is a waste of time and resources. My legislation will help restore accountability to the BATFE testing process and help restore the words ‘made in America’ to our firearms.”
After the Illinois State House of Representatives passed out of committee a string of anti-gun bills aimed at further eroding gun rights in the Prairie State, CCRKBA suggested that Chicago-dominated lawmakers ought to just put out a welcome sign for criminals at the state border. Anti-gun schemes headed for floor debate include gun rationing, restrictive handgun dealer licensing and a ban on semiautomatic sport-utility rifles. Such a ban could put several Illinois-based firearm manufacturers out of business, or force them to move their businesses to other states. Lawmakers behind these bills include three Chicago Democrats, Harry Osterman, Edward J. Avecedo and Luis Arroyo, and Oak Park Democrat Deborah L. Graham. “This kind of nonsense infuriates gun owners,” said CCRKBA Chairman Alan M. Gottlieb. “Lawmakers from Chicago want to export their anti-gun philosophy throughout the state. Of course, it’s pretty clear that Chicago’s gun control policies have been a dismal failure for years.”
In Texas, Gov. Rick Perry signed into a law a bill that expands Texans’ existing right to use deadly force to defend themselves “without retreat” in their homes, cars and workplaces. “The right to defend oneself from an imminent act of harm should not only be clearly defined in Texas law, but is intuitive to human nature,” said Perry. The new law, which takes effect September 1, extends an exception to a statute that required a person to retreat in the face of a criminal attack. The exception was in the case of an intruder unlawfully entering a person’s house. The law extends a person’s right to stand his or her ground beyond the home to vehicles and workplaces, allowing the reasonable use of deadly force, Gov. Perry’s office noted.
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